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April 25, 2017

New Book on Norris Families in England

The Norris Family of Kent England
by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

This book follows two distinct Norris families in Kent England.

The first is the Norris family found in Lenham Kent in 1773 when Edward Norris and Catherine Earl were married in the Lenham parish church. Four generations of their descendants are followed.

The second is the Norris family of Elmsted and Waltham Kent. This family was in Elmsted in 1680 when John Norris was baptised in St. James the Great church. By the time of his marriage to Mary Carr in 1710, he had moved to Waltham. His descendants are followed for three generations.

Documents and family group charts are included.

8.5 x 11 ", 32 pages




April 24, 2017

Find an Ancestor to Canada in Poor Law Union Records

Are you looking for an ancestor coming to Canada between 1836 and 1853? You may already know that this is a challenging time period in which to find a ships passenger list, as Canada did not archive Canadian ships passenger lists until 1865.

Sample Poor Law Union Record
But there are substitutes, including Olive Tree Genealogy's names of those found in Poor Law Union Records of individuals being sent to Canada from England.

Other substitute immigration records for pre-1865 immigration to Canada include

There are many more substitute immigration records listed, with links, at Canadian Ships Passenger Lists Before 1865

April 23, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 49R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

Caption on and under this photo reads "Photo with inscription. 13_10_15. "Thanks for kindness attention from Corporal Barber ASCMT 1st Division Field amb."

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"


April 21, 2017

Sis Munro, Who Are You?

Hubs and I love antiques. There is nothing we enjoy doing more than spending a day antiquing. My favourite is when an antique has some written history with it. That was the case recently with this very old blanket box.

The outside was stenciled with the initials "S.M." and inside on the lid someone had written in pencil "Sis Munro" and then "Landed in Toronto July 5, 1911"

It was too exciting and intriguing for me to pass up so I bought it.  My hope was that Sis Munro would be easily found in the online Ships Passenger Lists on Ancestry.com.

Unfortunately it hasn't been that easy to find Ms. Munro. Ocean going ships did not land in Toronto but further east - Quebec or Halifax for example. So if the writing was the correct date I needed to find Ms. Munro landing earlier than July 5th. Of course she may have arrived from America across Lake Ontario to Toronto in which case it was unlikely I'd find her.

I did find an interesting candidate to possibly be "my" Sis Munro but it's not quite fitting for me. A Susie B. Munro age 28, with Grace age 2 arrived in Halifax on July 11, 1911. She stated she was coming from St. John's Newfoundland and had been in Canada previously, in 1903. That seemed a strange notation but it isn't really, as Newfoundland was not part of Canada until 1947. But oddly, a second notation in brackets reads "in transit to England". I don't think this is the right Sis Munro but I'm at a standstill.

So here are photos of the inscriptions inside the box. Perhaps I'm reading them incorrectly.

 
I still hope to find Sis Munro and if any of my readers have ideas or suggestions, please leave a comment on this post.

April 20, 2017

Are You a Schulze Descendant?

Announcing my new book on The Schulze Family of Germany & Yorkshire England

84 pages
11x8.5 "

Georg Heinrich Christian (Henry) Schulze, a skilled cabinet maker, left Germany for Yorkshire England between 1867 and 1868. He and his wife Marie Catharina Friederke (Mary) Gercken settled in Bradford where their ten children were born. Two of their children died at a young age.

This book includes details, with documents, of Minnie, Charles, Emma, Elizabeth, Harry, Oscar, Rose, and James Schulze and their families. Family group charts and photos are included

New Book: The Hubbard Family of Kent England


The Hubbard Family of Kent England by Lorine McGinnis Schulze available now on Amazon.
26 pages. 8.5x11" $6.99

The Hubbard family has been found in Dover, Kent England back to Isaac Hubbard who married the widow Mary Ducy in St. James in 1698.

This book follows Isaac and Mary's descendants down four generations through their son Isaac, their grandson Philip, their great-grandson Philip and their great-great-granddaughter Milly Elizabeth who married John Caspall.

Full details plus images of all genealogy documents for the individuals named above are provided.  Basic information on all siblings is also included.

April 19, 2017

Dutch Love Child, Son of Native Canadian Vet, Granted Citizenship

Will van Ee from Holland had searched for his father for many years. Mr. Van Ee, the illegitimate son of an aboriginal Canadian soldier and a Dutch girl who met during the Second World war never knew his father or his father's name. His mother was Hendrike Herber and after Will's birth she married Albert Van Ee whose surname Will used.

Then one day a cousin gave van Ee an old photograph. Hendrike is shown alongside a beaming Canadian soldier named Walter Majeki. Van Ee’s aunt told her nephew that Walter was his biological father.

Van Ee then enlisted the help of Olga Rains, a Dutch war bride in Peterborough, Ontario dedicated to reuniting other WW2 children with their Canadian families. In 1984 Walter's brother was found. Sadly Walter had died several years before, but Will flew to Toronto to meet his new-found family.

After meeting his uncle and cousin, Van Ee became a full-status member of the Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nation in Northern Ontario, and later was granted Canadian citizenship.

Read the rest of this poignant story at Dutch love-child fathered by First Nations’ Canadian veteran finds lost identity, gets citizenship

Image credit: Screenshot from http://www.nationalpost.com


April 17, 2017

April 16, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 38 V

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

Sir Robert Borden
The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.


Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.


I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

April 15, 2017

Rescued Photo Album 1930s Carillon Quebec page 5

This is the next page of the Flynn family photo album. The page is labelled "Carillon 1931". The first photo has no identifying information. The middle photo has "age 5" and the last photo of two young boys has the names "J. Molloy" and "T. Rodden"




April 14, 2017

DNA Testing Solves Mystery of Young Girl Who Disappeared on Titanic

In April 1912 Montreal financier Hudson Allison with his wife Bess and their two children, Trevor, seven months, and Loraine, two years of age, journeyed across the Atlantic on the Titanic. After the ship sank, Hudson's body was the only one found. Little Trevor was supposedly rescued by a maid but no one knew what had happened to Lorraine and her mother Bess.

Thursday, September 5, 1940
Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
Page: 19
Fast forward to 1940 when Helen Kramer came forward claiming to be Lorraine. This was never proven and when Helen died in 1992 her claim died with her. 20 years later Helen's granddaughter Debrina claimed she had more evidence proving that Helen was indeed Lorraine Allison.

Then DNA testing entered the picture with relatives from both families contributing their DNA for comparison. I won't spoil the mystery by telling my readers the result, but you can find out by going to the full story at DNA Testing Solves Mystery of Young Girl Who Disappeared on Titanic

If you have not yet had your DNA tested, you might want to do so at AncestryDNA . It's a fascinating and revealing look at your ethnic origins.
Evening Star 1940






Guest Post: Avoiding 5 Common Mistakes of Beginning Genealogists


If you’re looking for ways to improve your research skills, it’s always best to take a personal inventory of your research practices and habits. Following are five common errors that many beginners and hobbyists make which, if eliminated, could save time and increase accuracy immensely.

1.    Collecting Ancestors – This is one of the most common mistakes. Simply copying down someone else’s tree or taking their information at face value without sources or explanation is a quick way to perpetuate untrue lineages and family stories. A good rule of thumb is to be able to give a solid reason for every bit of information you add to your database/tree/chart. How do you know that John is the son of Robert? And how do you know that that Robert is the right one when there is another man by the same name a county over? Traditions handed down can be helpful and even true, but a good genealogist always double checks! (And P.S. – use special caution when attempting to tie into “royal lines”; many are known to have been fabricated long ago.)

2.    Fishing for the Famous – We encounter this fairly frequently, and it involves trying to prove a relationship to a notable person simply because you share the same last name. “I am from the South and my last name is Lee. We are probably related to the famous Confederate General Robert E. Lee.” Such an assumption is not a sound approach and is very seldom true. The best course of action is to start with your recent family and move backward. Avoid beginning with a celebrity or historical figure and trying to force him into your tree!

3.    Tunnel Vision – It is usually difficult to find direct-line ancestors if the rest of the family is ignored. In your research, build complete families, not just single lines of descent. Don’t just know who your ancestor was and who he married, but research who his siblings and their spouses were. Even studying his unrelated close friends and associates can often be the key to solving a brick-wall problem. If your ancestor didn’t leave much of a paper trail, there’s a good chance that one of his siblings did, taking you back to the next generation you couldn’t have found only researching one man or woman.

4.    Incomplete Research – Lone records can often contain inaccuracies, or at the very least, a fragmented part of the story. Be sure to make the effort to confirm information that you find with multiple records whenever possible. Find a headstone? Great! If possible, also locate a death certificate, parish record, obituary, and/or will.

5.    Being Disorganized – Do you have notes scribbled on three different notepads and tucked away on Post-Its, backs of envelopes, and other random slips of paper? This one is for you! Your research experience will improve if you make a concerted effort to keep everything in one place. The same can go for Word documents scattered around your hard drive. Make folders, keep notes in your pedigree software, and always back-up your files externally! No one wants to lose ten years’ worth of research because their computer crashes!

Don’t be discouraged if you find yourself making these mistakes from time to time! Genealogy is a fun field, but it can also be exacting, with a steep learning curve. Even as professionals, we are constantly growing and figuring out better ways of doing things, and everyone benefits from raised standards!

Legacy Tree Genealogists provides full-service genealogical research for clients worldwide, helping them discover their roots and personal history through records, narratives, and DNA. Based near the world's largest family history library in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah, Legacy Tree has developed a network of professional researchers and archives around the globe. For additional information on services visit us on Legacy Tree.

Exclusive Offer for Olive Tree Genealogy readers: Receive $100 off a 20-hour research project using code SAVE100, valid through April 21st, 2017. Just use the link  Legacy Tree

April 12, 2017

Burials at Highgate Cemetery London UK Now Online

Highgate Cemetery in London England is chock full of very well-known personalities such as Karl Marx, Christina Rosetti, George Elliott, and my personal favourite - scientist/Mathmatician Michael Faraday. Singer George Michael also lies there.

Details of all 160,000 burials between 1839 and 2010 at the cemetery have now been made available online. Deceased Online has been digitizing the burials for the public to freely consult. There is a small fee to download the actual record.

Read more on the Evening Standard Highgate Cemetery reveals all 160,000 burial records for first time

New Book: The Wildbore Family of Kent England

  The Wildbore family is found in Minster, Thanet, Kent England as far back as 1550. The surname has been found as Wildbore, Wildebore, Wildboar, Wyldbore, Wyldboar, Wyldebore, and Wilbore.

  The Wildbore Family of Kent England by Lorine McGinnis Schulze is now available on Amazon.   This book follows 4 generations of descendants of George Wildbore and his wife Alicia Pamphlett (nee Sackett) who married in Minster, Thanet, Kent England in 1571.

Only $6.99 in paperback.  8.5x11 inches

Available soon on Amazon.ca

April 10, 2017

The Age of Daredevils - Fun Stories of Niagara Falls

By turns a family drama and an action-adventure story, The Age of Daredevils chronicles the lives of the men and women who devoted themselves to the extraordinary sport of jumping over Niagara Falls in a barrel—a death-defying gamble that proved a powerful temptation to a hardy few.

Available on Amazon.ca and Amazon.com

Read more at  Niagara writer dives into the Age of Daredevils

These stories fascinate me because my great-grandfather's cousin Stephen Peer walked Niagara Falls on a tightrope, and has the dubious distinction of being the only tightroper walker to fall to his death. You can read his story on my blog at Stephen Peer, Tighrope Walker of Niagara Falls in Carnival of Genealogy “I read it in the news!”

April 9, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 53R & 53V

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.



The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

April 7, 2017

Belgian Woman Searches for her Canadian soldier father

Florence Heene never knew her father. She first saw a photo of the man she believes is the soldier who is her biological dad when she was young. Now 71, Florence posted the photo on Facebook hoping it might be shared and that someone in Canada would recognize him.

Her mother had told Heene that her biological father was a Canadian soldier who was stationed in Ghent during the Second World War. It is believed his first name is Herbert. Library and Archives Canada (LAC) believes from the photo that the man in question was a Sergeant in the Royal Canadian Military.

 Read Searching for a Canadian soldier: Belgian woman makes last-ditch effort to find her father

Since writing this blog post, the mystery of Herbert has been solved. It's as fascinating  (and sad) a story as Florence's search for him.

Read Mystery solved: Belgian woman finds 'new family' in Canada in search for soldier father

April 5, 2017

DNA May Help Identify Victims of Spanish Civil War

When the Spanish Civil War ended in 1939, many civilians had disappeared - executed and buried in unmarked mass graves. Some estimates suggest that 2,000 mass graves may hold the remains of up to 150,000 victims.

Gumiel de Izán is one of the known mass graves, and a few years ago, archaeology volunteers began exhuming the bones of those buried there. A social anthropologist was present to supervise the recording of memories of elders in the nearby village. Using DNA testing it is hoped that relatives of the missing will finally have answers as to where their loved ones are buried.

Read more at  Gathering the Genetic Testimony of Spain’s Civil War Dead

Image is a screenshot from the article on Scientific American (https://www.scientificamerican.com/)

April 3, 2017

Canada: Who Do We Think We Are?


Canada: Who Do We Think We Are? is a new exhibition by Library and Archives Canada (LAC) marking the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation.

Each month in 2017 a guest curator will add a new exhibit to the online virtual exhibition.
 
Isabelle Charron was the guest curator for March with a map of New France made by the Father of Canada, Samuel de Champlain. Ms. Charron has written an article about herself and the map. She also includes several other images at https://thediscoverblog.com/2017/03/09/guest-curator-isabelle-charron/

Carte geographique de la Nouvelle Franse faictte par le sieur de Champlain [map of New France made by Samuel de Champlain], from the book Les voyages du sieur de Champlain…, 1613, engraved by David Pelletier in 1612

Official Announcement follows:

Canada: Who Do We Think We Are? is a new exhibition by Library and Archives Canada (LAC) marking the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation. This exhibition is accompanied by a year-long blog series.

Join us every month in 2017! Experts from LAC, from across Canada and from other countries provide additional information about the exhibition. Each “guest curator” discusses one item, then adds another to the exhibition—virtually.

Be sure to visit Canada: Who Do We Think We Are? at 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa, from June 5, 2017, to March 1, 2018. Admission is free.

April 2, 2017

Who Do You Think You Are? Jessic Biel

Tonight’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are? at 10/9c on TLC, actress Jessica Biel makes surprising discoveries that change what she thought knew about her heritage. She sets out to debunk several tales of family lore. 

Catch a sneak peek of the episode here:https://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are/videos/jessica-biels-journey

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 44 R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

Inscription: 103 Newspaper clipping. Roll of Honor includes Miss Philip. This page also includes a  2-page letter to be published next week


The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

April 1, 2017

Rescued Photo Album 1930s Carillon Quebec page 3

This is page 3 of the rescued Flynn family photo album

This page has photos of two young boys, both labelled "age 5".  This page is dated "August 1931" and the location is "Carillon"

March 31, 2017

Find Ancestors in WW1 Red Cross Military Files

If you are searching for an ancestor who fought in World War One, the Red Cross Military Files are a valuable resource. During the war the Red Cross provided vital services for prisoners of war, and wounded or missing soldiers.

Hundreds of thousands of volunteers were engaged in the war effort under the Red Cross supervision and often this resulted in records being kept of the volunteers and soldiers. Not all Red Cross records in all countries have survived and in some countries the records were never made. However some countries’ files have been digitized and are available online.

My February article for Legacy Family News will no doubt interest many genealogists. I have compiled a brief history of the Red Cross Military Files and provided links to any that survive for United States, Canada, Australia and Great Britain.

Continue reading  Find Your Ancestor in WW1 Red Cross Military Files

March 29, 2017

Looking for Grave of King Henry I

An archaeological project is trying to find the tomb of King Henry I (1068-1135), son of William the Conqueror. Radar technology has found some intriguing evidence at Reading Abbey Quarter which was a monastery that was destroyed during Henry VIII's reign.

It is known that King Henry was buried at this monastery in January 1136 after his death in Normandy. The monastery is closed to the public for the dig but is expected to re-open in 2018. It will be very interesting to see what has been found when the results are made public. 

Read the following stories for more details:

MoJ plans to dig for Henry I's remains at Reading Prison

Graves discovered in King Henry I dig
 
Search Is On for King Henry I, Who May Be Buried Under a Parking Lot
 

March 27, 2017

Share and Share Alike

A blog post by Judy G. Russell on her blog The Legal Genealogist was published in July 2016. Judy's words are important and her post should be read by all genealogists.

The expectation of some genealogists that we must share all research that we do, is something we will all be faced with at some point.  I call that the GIFS (Genealogy is For Sharing) mentality.

In fact it is not incumbent on us to share anything we don't choose to share. My belief is that those who expect or demand full sharing haven't thought about the reasons why an individual may not choose to share their research or a document or a family photograph.

Sometimes I share, sometimes I do not. Why do I not share all the time?

1. Because sometimes I choose to write a book about  my findings. This allows me to spread the information further afield than just one person, and also gives me a small portion of money back against what I spent in time, obtaining documents, travel expenses and so on.

2. Because I have seen my careful, methodical research taken and mixed in with incorrect information, causing a horrific genealogy mess that gets published in an online tree or passed via email to others. In other words, I lose control of the quality of the work I did.

Other times I will gladly share all my research with an interested descendant. It depends on the interaction I have with that person, how willing they are to share in return and what they plan to do with the documents and photos.

I have other reasons for sharing/not sharing but let's hear from you on how you feel about this topic. Meantime please take a few minutes to read Judy's blog post No Right to Sharing

March 26, 2017

Canadian Expeditionary Force, CEF, Constance Philip's WW1 Album, Digital Preservation, Nursing Sister WW1 Photos, Nursing Sisters, WW1 Photo Album Archive 61R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

2 Matrons, 70 Nurses, & 8 doctors on board Zeeland. 
March 17th 1915. 
No fear of torpedoes here!

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

March 25, 2017

Noah Wyle on Who Do You Think You Are?

On this Sunday’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are? at 10/9c on TLC, actor Noah Wyle unravels the mystery of his mother's family line, searching for answers to a lifelong question about his family’s participation in the Civil War. 

He discovers an ancestor who was catapulted into one of the bloodiest battles of the time, and whose life spiraled out of control from remarkable success to a shocking and tragic end.


Catch a sneak peek of Noah's episode

Next week’s episode follows actress Jessica Biel

Image Credit: TLC

Rescued Photo Album 1930s Carillon Quebec page 2

This is page 2 of the rescued Flynn family photo album.

The page is dated 1924 but there is no other identifying information. 

 

March 24, 2017

March Update WW1 Service Files Canadian Soldiers

Sample from PDF file for James Cecil Sandercock, KIA
Digitization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Personnel Service Files – Update of March 2017

The following press release came into Olive Tree Genealogy's mailbox:

As of March 15, 416,749 of 640,000 files are available online in our Personnel Records of the First World War database. Please visit the Digitization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Service Files page for more details on the digitization project.

Library and Archives Canada is digitizing the service files systematically, from box 1 to box 10686, which roughly corresponds to alphabetical order. Please note that over the years, the content of some boxes has had to be moved and, you might find that the file you want, with a surname that is supposed to have been digitized, is now located in another box that has not yet been digitized. So far, we have digitized the following files:
  • Latest box digitized: Box 7059 and last name McLelland.

March 22, 2017

Mother's Adventures Part 1 Australia at Age 80

As mentioned in a previous blog post, my mother was an adventurer. At the age of 80 she made a decision to backpack through Australia. On her own. I had set her up on a computer when she was in her late 70s, and showed her how to email and look around on websites for genealogy information. She enjoyed doing this and often spoke to me about how much fun it was to "smurf" the 'net. Yes that's what she called it - smurfing the 'net.

Mother (3rd from right) in Australia waiting for her hot air balloon ride
We had relatives in Australia and Mother met new people through her mailing lists and genealogy forums. This spurred her to wanting to go to Australia to meet some of them. Her final push to go was when she asked me to book a hot air balloon ride for her for her 80th birthday. I wasn't able to do that and so she decided her gift to herself would be the trip to Australia where she'd find that hot air balloon ride she wanted.

To get ready for the trip, mother purchased a pink Barbie backpack - one made for children. She was only 5'1" tall so a child's pack fit her perfectly. Next came Tilly clothing - 2 sets, plus a Tilly hat. Adding socks and underwear, a few toiletries, and an extra pair of shoes, mother declared herself ready. She fit everything she needed into that backpack and booked her trip.

Here are her own words from her trip journal with some editing for brevity:


As my 80th birthday was only a year away I thought it wise to go somewhere that I knew for the first trip alone.  I could then branch out with confidence. My first trip was on a tour for 20 days to Australia and New Zealand.  I flew from Toronto to Vancouver then to Hawaii, then to New Zealand.  I had been in touch with a cousin who lived  near Wellington and she and her husband were going to come to the hotel on the evening of our return from the North end of the island to compare our notes on our Family Tree.  It was a lovely visit and we each found things to add to our respective family trees. It was exciting  to finally meet the family I had found through research in New Zealand. 

I had no idea when I started researching  the Stead family that some of them had emigrated to New Zealand as well as Australia.  I had been in touch with the ones in Australia for some years as one of the relatives had made a trip to Canada sometime in 1950.  I only met him once for a few minutes and did not remember him.  One of my mother’s brothers emigrated to Australia and the rest  of the family came to Canada.

 
I enjoyed New Zealand the only thing that I didn’t enjoy was the rain, it rained 10 out of the 21 days we spent there.  If you are going on a tour by yourself you can ask to be teamed up with another  person who is alone and hope you get a partner who is compatible.  This time I was not very lucky as she was discontented and surly.  This lady had only booked for two weeks instead of three so I had a week by myself.  I was glad because we did not get along.  It was the only time I had a problem with partners  on my trips. It could have spoilt [sic] the last two weeks as she did not speak to me unless she had to.  


After we saw all the sights on the north island we boarded the boat for the south island which was completely different to the north  even the climate was different.  It was colder and there were mountains which we did not see in the other part. We went right down to the end and the mountains were quite high there.  There was snow on the top of them and the last night there was quite cold.  I really did not expect it to be so cold.   I was sick and had to call the leader about 10:00 at night and get a doctor to come out and see me.  This was the only time in all my travels that this happened.  I ended up with a throat infection and had to keep by myself as much as possible.  No one else got sick thank goodness and in a day or two I was fine.


We went back up to Wellington and took the flight to Sydney to finish this tour. By the time we got to Sydney I was fine.  We had a tour of Sydneys water front, saw the new opera house and other things of interest  there. .  My cousin met me there and took me home with him.  I added some more time to my trip and changed my flight to come back home as I wanted to ride the train across country to Perth on the Pacific Ocean.


I booked the train ride and Frank, my cousin, drove me to Sydney when the time came to leave for the West Coast.  He  got  on and was very impressed by the accommodation.  I had a room by myself with a bed and a cabinet holding a toilet and wash basin so that I could get a wash in the morning if I did not want to go out to the shower room in the morning.  There was also a little seat so I did not have to go out of my room unless I wanted to. 


I was sitting on the stool the first morning and a lady came walking along and asked if I was alone.  I said I was and she came in and sat down and we introduced ourselves and decided to go to breakfast together.  She was wonderful company and we spent the rest of the journey together..  We had a wonderful trip and we still correspond.  


We got to a little place called Kilgori just on the edge of the last state which to find that the railway employees were on strike and we could go no further until it was settled.  We had two days  in this little backwater of a town before we could go on.  People who booked trips on the west coast were put on buses and rode all  night to catch their tours and the rest of us stayed on the train until the strike was over.  We had a great time on the train waiting to go on.  We really got to know each other and the train personnel very well.  

....to be continued

March 20, 2017

A Lost Village of Freed Slaves

In the late 1800s a small village of freed slaves began on the outskirts of Cambridge Massachusetts. Not much is known of this community which apparently was called Lewisville. The authors of a new book on the history and settlement of Cambridge discovered records of the village accidentally when studying an 1870 map.

Typical slave cabin
According to the authors, Lewisville was an "African-American settlement that dispersed before the Civil War, where many members went to Africa in the African immigration movement. But it really disappeared in the 1880s."

Read more at In tracing Cambridge history, researchers uncover lost village of freed slaves

Because I was curious about who had lived there, I searched the 1870 census and found 201 black individuals listed as living in Ward 2 of Cambridge. I cannot say with certainty that these were families in Lewisville but I plan on doing more research to see what I can find out.

The Summer 2013 Newsletter of the Cambridge Historical Society has this small excerpt which may provide some clues as to the origin of the community's name:

Just east of Observatory Hill was a free, self-sufficient African American community, known as Lewisville, from the beginning of the 19th century. This settlement was roughly between Concord Avenue, Garden Street, and Shepard Street. Some of the residents were the descendants of slaves of the Vassall family, and by the middle of the 19th century, some had become political. In the early 1850s, Adam Lewis joined the abolitionist colony at Dawn, Ontario, and in 1858 Enoch Lewis led a group of 23 members of the Cambridge Liberian Emigrant Association to settle in St. Paul’s River in Liberia.
In 1850 and 1855 he is found in Ward 1 with other black famiies.


The Dawn Settlement, founded in 1841, was a rural community where Blacks could pool their labour, resources and skills to help each other and incoming settlers. It contained farm land, a saw mill, gristmill, brick yard, rope manufactory and school.  Adam Lewis, age 31, is found in this settlement in the 1851 census of Upper Canada (present day Ontario) with his wife Mary and 6 year old daughter Frances.

Adam's death certificate of 1900 indicates his place of birth as Missouri and it is possible that more information could be found if anyone were interested.


March 18, 2017

Rescued Photo Album 1930s Carillon Quebec

Old family photo albums are such precious items. Often they can be found lying neglected and in sad shape in flea markets and antique stores. When I can afford them, I rescue them and put the photos online in hopes a descendant will spot the treasure.

Recently I stumbled on this 11x7 inch photo album from the 1930s. It is chock full of family photos of individuals, of tombstones and even a photo of students in a school classroom from 1934.

Almost every page is dated and has the location noted, but there are very few names. However the tombstone photos provided wonderful clues and I was able to solve the mystery of what family is represented in this album. I won't make you wait - the family is the Flynn family of Carillon (near Montreal) Quebec. This album also reveals the intermarriage of the Bradley family and others.

Here is page 1 of the Flynn family album. 



This tombstone reads:

In Memory of William Flynn
died 29 December 1905
age 57 years 5 months

Agnes B. Flynn
died March 16 1899 
age 21 years

Jane Dundon
wife of John Flynn
died 18 June 1899
age73
a Native of Co. [Limerick?] Ireland 


The tombstone photo is labelled 1928. There are two missing photos, each labelled with dates but no other information.

To follow this project as I scan and place the photos online, just choose "Flynn Photo Album" in the right side bar. If you are related to this family, and would like to own the album, email me at olivetreegenealogy@gmail.com for details.